Upcoming Panels (September 2017)

Anime Weekend Atlanta, September 28-October 1, 2017

  • RPG Maker Scripting Crash Course (Saturday, 7pm, CGC 106) – Learn the basics of customizing your RPG Maker VX Ace game using Ruby scripting.
  • Otaku Board and Card Gaming (Saturday, 5:30pm, CGC 105) – A discussion of tabletop games that were either originally designed in Japan or have otaku-related themes. We’ll also talk about a bit about types of mechanics/genres these games fit into.

DevSpace, Huntsville, AL, October 13-14, 2017

  • Game Dev for Business Developers – With the rise of engines like Unity, the languages and tools available for game development often overlap with those used in web and desktop development. Conceptually, however, it’s a completely different world. We’ll discuss some of the key differences to help ease the transition into the world of hobbyist game development.
  • Finishing Your Unity Game – For game jammers and hobbyist devs, the process of releasing a game may seem like an afterthought compared to designing and building it–right up until you realize everything you need to do before you can finally click “Build” or “Submit”. This session will cover the easy-to-forget steps and last-minute decisions so you can plan ahead.

Using Source Control with RPG Maker VX Ace

I mentioned in my intro to RPG Maker scripting post (and in the panel that’s based on it) that you can use source control systems like Mercurial or Git with RPG Maker VX Ace, allowing you to take periodic snapshots of your work.

(First, you’ll want to read a tutorial about how your chosen source control system works, such as hginit.com for Mercurial. This post will make a lot more sense once you do.)

What I neglected to mention is there’s two big, easy-to-forget gotchas with this setup.

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Upcoming Panels (April 2017)

MTAC, April 14-16, Nashville, TN

  • Otaku Board & Card Gaming (Friday 4pm, Panel B): A discussion of tabletop games that were either originally designed in Japan or have otaku-related themes. We’ll also talk about a bit about types of mechanics/genres these games fit into.
  • RPG Maker Scripting Crash Course (Sunday 10am, Panel D 2:45pm, Panel A): Learn the basics of customizing your RPG Maker VX Ace game using Ruby scripting.

MomoCon, May 25-28, Atlanta, GA

  • Otaku Tabletop Gaming (Saturday 10pm, Panel 406): A discussion of tabletop games that were either originally designed in Japan or have otaku-related themes. We’ll also talk about a bit about types of mechanics/genres these games fit into.
  • Game Dev for Fun (and not profit) (Friday 10am, Panel 406): How to get into game development as a hobbyist. We’ll focus on some examples of 2D games in Unity (a cross-platform game dev tool), other tools that are available (some free), and how to find the support and motivation you need to get involved.

Unhacked

If you happen to be following by RSS and caught the last couple of posts… I’m back.

As dire as it sounds, there was apparently a WordPress vulnerability discovered recently that allowed anonymous users to create and edit posts. As I don’t regularly touch the site, I didn’t see the updated version that fixed the issue, and so this (and several other sites I host) were affected.

RPG Maker VX Ace scripting: Thinking through a UI change

My last post was basically an info dump on what I’d learned about RPG Maker Ruby scripting during Ludum Dare 37. From the comments I got on it, I realized “info dump” is not an exaggeration–it’s literally a bunch of abstract, raw information without any examples, and so it’s confusing if you haven’t messed with it before.

So, let’s walk through how we’d think through a very simple change.

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Instantiating a Procedurally Generated Platformer in Unity

This is a follow-up to my last post, Building a Procedurally Generated Platformer, which (not being a disciplined blogger) I’d sort of forgotten about until a comment about an off-hand remark I’d made about another blog post popped up in my RSS feed. Then (again, not being a disciplined blogger), I forgot about that half-finished post until I started thinking about writing a new post and checked my WordPress admin.

In the last post, we discussed one way you could randomly generate a two-dimensional array of values representing ground, platform, and trap tiles. For example, it might look like this:

ProceduralGeneratedPlatformerBlog9The trick, of course, is to convert each of these chunks into actual Unity objects, and to do so in a way that performs well.

Because we’ll be adding new chunks as needed, we want to make sure we don’t freeze play due to adding large chunks that are costly to instantiate. Because we want to restart the level quickly (without reloading the scene), we want to minimize the cost of creating new game objects.
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